Streamateria launching dress this fall

Buy, wear and throw away without climate guilt. A dress designed to die. That’s how Swedish Fashion Tech company Streamateria describes their new compostable dress, planned to be released in the fall. They have found a wood based material to work with and are now looking for collaborators interested in developing it. Not much else to report on this right now, but here’s a first look at the dress:
Streamateria

Screenshot from Streamateria, LinkedIn.

Annonser

Smart jewellry + AI voice assistant: a winning combination?

With the demise of several smart jewellery companies this year,  it’s refreshing to see Swarg Tech’s new piece of smart jewellery Sahki, with its beautiful jewel embellishments. So what about the tech specs?
Well, apart from the fitness tracker and SOS trigger you see in most wearables, this one also has a child tracking mode and an integrated AI voice assistant to help you add items to your shopping list or switch on the lights for instance.
With the growing popularity of voice assistants, it is likely that the integration of them into smart jewllery might be a winning combo.
Sakhi_Exploded-e1526807057418-696x456

Google launches camera feature for style discoveries

Asos have done it, and so have e-Bay. Tinkered with image recognition for clothing that is. Now it’s Google’s turn to launch a style discovery service called Style Match, where you simply point your camera towards an item you like and you get suggestions on where to buy it, or something similar, online. The service is part of Google Lens, their camera powered search engine that was released last year. This works not only for fashion, but for things like accessories and furniture as well, The Current reports.
Skärmavbild 2018-05-15 kl. 11.14.05
Screenshot from Gadget 360-demo video.

Nike’s Flyprint: say hi to the world’s first 3D-printed sneaker textile

We have seen some efforts with 3D-printing when it comes to sneakers before, mostly on midsoles. But earlier this spring, the first sneaker made of a 3D-printed textile saw the light of day, Esquire reports. The upper on Nike’s Flyprint sneaker is made with a process called solid deposit modeling which makes the textile both extra light and breathable, so that any water that finds its way into the shoe evaporates faster and extra light. Another benefit is the material’s ability to iterate which makes prototyping really fast.
Skärmavbild 2018-05-09 kl. 08.39.32Skärmavbild 2018-05-09 kl. 08.40.00
Screenshots from Nike Flyprint promo video.

New head of research group to lead the development of new sustainable materials

Radical thinking is needed when it comes to investing in new materials. And that is what The Burberry Foundation and The Royal College of Art is hoping that Professor Sharon Baurley, their newly appointed Professor of Design and Materials, and Chair of the Burberry Material Futures Research Group, will bring. As FashNerd reports, she will now play a key role in applying radical thinking to invent new sustainable materials. Baurley has a long track record as Head of Design in several institutions, as well as consultations and industry collaborations on research.
The RCA was awarded 3 million pounds last year by The Burberry Foundation to form The Burberry Material Futures Research Group.

Check out the world’s first 3D-printed jacket – that you can actually buy

Israeli design student Danit Peleg made waves of excitement in the Fashion tech world when she released her 3D-printed clothing collection in 2015. The collection was part of her graduation project, which is why it’s now very exciting to see her launch her – and the world’s first – fully 3D-printed and commercially available piece of clothing: The ”Imagine” bomber jacket.
The jacket is part of a limited edition collection of 100 jackets, that you can preorder and personalize on Peleg’s website. By the looks of her Instagram account swimwear also seems to be in the making for the summer, so I suggest you keep your eyes open.
Imagine jacket 12

Imagine jacket 8Photo credit, both photos: Daria Ratiner
Skärmavbild 2018-04-17 kl. 15.07.25
Screenshot from Danit Peleg’s Instagram.

SXSW 2018: Bose launches ‘hear what you see’ AR sunglasses

Audio AR? Now, what on earth is that? Well, we all know about visual AR, where you put a layer of extra visual information to what you see in your surroundings. For instance a map with directions on top of the street view you have in front of you. Audio AR is instead a layer of sound information added to what you see around you. And this is exactly what headphone company Bose is doing with their prototype AR sunglasses they just presented at SXSW.
So how does it work then? Well, you put the glasses on and as soon as you see something you want to know more about, you just tap on the stem and you get the info right in your ear. The glasses know what you’re looking at without needing a camera. Instead they use on-board motion sensors that can detect the direction you’re facing. They are also programmed to recognize head gestures, such as nodding and turning. For instance, you can nod your head to take an incoming call or shake it to decline.
Designwise they actually look pretty good for a prototype, and according to reports they are very light and easy to wear. So that’s promising.
But of course it’s all about the data. So far Bose is working with TripAdvisor, Yelp, Asics Studio, Strava and TuneIn, and hopefully there’s more to come for this product to work the way it’s intended.
The glasses will be released in a first version this summer.
Bose_AR_Prototype_Glasses-Social
Photo: Bose